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Water Filters/Purifiers


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#1 emmsmama

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 08:57 PM

Anybody have recommendations? Someone recommended Berkey filtration systems and I'm considering that since it's not crazy pricey and is supposed to clean water of a lot of harmful stuff without removing beneficial minerals like reverse osmosis systems do.

Anybody have feedback to share on water filtration systems they use?

#2 creative mama

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 11:27 AM

I don't use one, but these look interesting. Did you try them or go with something different?

#3 terbear

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 12:38 PM

If you are drinking municipal drinking water there is no reason to buy a personal water treatment system. Municipally supplied drinking water in Ontario is very heavily monitored and SAFE! In fact, if you don't properly maintain the system you buy you can be causing an actual health concern.

Here info from Health Canada (website http://www.hc-sc.gc....ositifs-eng.php )

The link outlines the various treatment options but again municipal water treatment plants already treat the water coming into your home making the various home systems not necessary.

here is the link to Windsor's water it is full of very good info. http://www.wuc.on.ca...ent_process.cfm


Conclusions from Health Canada...

Although there is currently no specific legislation governing water treatment devices, Health Canada considers it essential that water processed through a water treatment device meets the quality set in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality (Health Canada, 5th Edition, 1993). It is worthwhile to note that water already satisfying the criteria in he guidelines does not normally require additional treatment in the home, at least for health­related reasons.

#4 JavaBean

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 03:41 PM

Teri, what are your thoughts on the current fluoridation of our water? This is one of the main things that concerns me, as fluoride is a known neurotoxin. I'd love to hear your take on this. :)

#5 emmsmama

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 06:14 PM

I don't use one, but these look interesting. Did you try them or go with something different?


I ordered a Berkey Light filter system. I should have it sometime next week and can give a review then. It's supposed to filter out a lot of harmful stuff without getting rid of the minerals our bodies need (reverse osmosis gets rid of the good and the bad). The place I ordered from had a deal for a set of fluoride filters and a sport bottle for free with my order, so I can see how those work too.

I am still torn on whether to use the fluoride filters as they use activated alumina I believe and aluminum is bad for you, however supposedly the reg. filters remove some aluminum and after tests it was found that the amount in water filtered through the reg. filters and then the fluoride filters had lower levels of aluminum than the tap water they started with, so hopefully I'm still coming out ahead healthwise by using the fluoride filters.

Edited by emmsmama, 26 March 2011 - 06:16 PM.
spelling error


#6 terbear

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 08:04 AM

Teri, what are your thoughts on the current fluoridation of our water? This is one of the main things that concerns me, as fluoride is a known neurotoxin. I'd love to hear your take on this. :)


lots of things are TOXIC when in high concentration and in certain circumstances. Heck even oxygen is toxic if administered 100% under pressure is toxic. Water itself is toxic if too much is consumed.

Just because the additive to the drinking water is "toxic" while sitting in the container (ya toxic if you take a spoonful and eat it right from the container)it does not mean at the low concentrations it arrives in your tap it remains toxic. There are many "toxc substances" that are necessary for life. Simple chemistry and concentrations that people far smarter than I understand. I believe the science and not the scare words of "toxic"

My thoughts: I believe the conclusions of the experts, as outlined on Health Canada's website to be true. http://www.hc-sc.gc....n/fluor-eng.php

The use of fluoride for the prevention of dental cavities is endorsed by over 90 national and international professional health organizations including Health Canada,Canadian Public Health Association, the Canadian Dental Association, Canadian Medical Association, US Food and Drug Administration and the World Health Organization.

I also believe the following conclusion (from the website above)

Health Canada has established the guideline for fluoride in drinking water as a maximum acceptable concentration of 1.5 milligrams per litre. Water containing fluoride at, or below, this maximum acceptable concentration does not pose a risk to human health.

You can check your local municipality to see what level of fluoride is. I can guarantee ALL municipal drinking water systems in ONTARIO are at or below this allowable limit.

Edited by terbear, 27 March 2011 - 08:06 AM.


#7 emmsmama

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 09:17 AM

I found this online regarding fluoride treatment levels in Windsor:

In Windsor, EnWin Utilities follows fluoridation guidelines set by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, said spokeswoman Sylvia de Vries. The maximum level is 8.5 ppm, but Enwin uses a level of 0.6 ppm, she said. “We are confident this is adequate fluoridation to maintain good dental care,” said de Vries.

Edited by emmsmama, 27 March 2011 - 09:18 AM.


#8 terbear

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:21 PM

I found this online regarding fluoride treatment levels in Windsor:

In Windsor, EnWin Utilities follows fluoridation guidelines set by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, said spokeswoman Sylvia de Vries. The maximum level is 8.5 ppm, but Enwin uses a level of 0.6 ppm, she said. “We are confident this is adequate fluoridation to maintain good dental care,” said de Vries.


that must be a typo and she meant to say .85 ppm not 8.5 ppm. Also FYI ppm (parts per million) and milligrams per litre are the same.

You can double check that by looking at all the data online Windsor has submitted.

ok just double checked myself. On the 2009 annual report they indicated they have a contineous monitors (which means they sample for floride 24 hours a day) The sample results for all of 2009 ranged from a low of 0.55 to a high of 0.75. Well below the maximum recommended by Health Canada. Yes the provinces (Ministry of the Environment) also has their own standards which in Ontario are usually more stringent.

Edited by terbear, 27 March 2011 - 03:41 PM.


#9 emmsmama

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:30 PM


I found this online regarding fluoride treatment levels in Windsor:

In Windsor, EnWin Utilities follows fluoridation guidelines set by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, said spokeswoman Sylvia de Vries. The maximum level is 8.5 ppm, but Enwin uses a level of 0.6 ppm, she said. “We are confident this is adequate fluoridation to maintain good dental care,” said de Vries.


that must be a typo and she meant to say .85 ppm not 8.5 ppm. Also FYI ppm (parts per million) and milligrams per litre are the same.

You can double check that by looking at all the data online Windsor has submitted.


Yeah, I thought that sounded crazy high. Here's the website I pulled that from:
http://www.canada.co...aa-1ae2a8d44e6d

#10 terbear

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:56 PM

The following is taken from Ontario Drinking Water Standards, Objectives and Guidelines (Ministry of the Environment)

Where fluoride is added to drinking water, it is recommended that the concentration be adjusted to 0.5 - 0.8 mg/L, the optimum level for control of tooth decay. Where supplies contain naturally occurring fluoride at levels higher than 1.5 mg/L mg/L but less than 2.4 mg/L the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care recommends an approach through local boards of health to raise public and professional awareness to control excessive exposure to fluoride from other sources. Levels above the MAC must be reported to the local Medical Officer of Health

The MAC (maximum allowable concentration) for fluoride is 1.5 mg/L

#11 terbear

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:59 PM



I found this online regarding fluoride treatment levels in Windsor:

In Windsor, EnWin Utilities follows fluoridation guidelines set by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, said spokeswoman Sylvia de Vries. The maximum level is 8.5 ppm, but Enwin uses a level of 0.6 ppm, she said. “We are confident this is adequate fluoridation to maintain good dental care,” said de Vries.


that must be a typo and she meant to say .85 ppm not 8.5 ppm. Also FYI ppm (parts per million) and milligrams per litre are the same.

You can double check that by looking at all the data online Windsor has submitted.




Yeah, I thought that sounded crazy high. Here's the website I pulled that from:
http://www.canada.co...aa-1ae2a8d44e6d


sorry I added some additional info after I checked Windsor's numbers. It has to be a typo!

Edited by terbear, 27 March 2011 - 03:59 PM.


#12 terbear

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:03 PM

Just to be clear. I was asked what I think about the flouride in drinking water. My answer is I believe the science and the experts when they say it is safe at the levels in Ontario that are monitored in municipal drinking water.

Flouride from other sources (like toothpaste) is a whole other issue. Safe amount in drinking water is what I am saying

#13 emmsmama

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:06 PM

Just to be clear. I was asked what I think about the flouride in drinking water. My answer is I believe the science and the experts when they say it is safe at the levels in Ontario that are monitored in municipal drinking water.

Flouride from other sources (like toothpaste) is a whole other issue. Safe amount in drinking water is what I am saying


See, to me topical flouride makes a lot more sense if you are going to supplement. It makes more sense to me to have it in toothpaste than in drinking water.

#14 terbear

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:09 PM


Just to be clear. I was asked what I think about the flouride in drinking water. My answer is I believe the science and the experts when they say it is safe at the levels in Ontario that are monitored in municipal drinking water.

Flouride from other sources (like toothpaste) is a whole other issue. Safe amount in drinking water is what I am saying


See, to me topical flouride makes a lot more sense if you are going to supplement. It makes more sense to me to have it in toothpaste than in drinking water.


but the people most at risk for tooth decay, the struggling families who can't afford proper dental care nor various supplemental options would not have access.

#15 terbear

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:12 PM

oh and not to mention it goes back to concentrations...drinking water provides minimal flouride over time vs flouride dental treatments or toothpaste that may have it in higher concentrations. Higher the concentration the more potential for problems

#16 Outnumbered

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:43 PM

I'm often at a loss to explain how people can believe that a multi-million dollar municipal treatment system can leave dangerous substances in our water, but those same "dangerous" compounds can be easily removed with a $50 filter.

I understand about the fluoridation issue, but even that is present in such minute quantities that I don't see how the concern is warranted.

#17 JavaBean

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 05:00 PM

Thanks for the reply and linkage, Teri. I'll probably have more questions when I'm done reading. :)

#18 emmsmama

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 05:48 PM

I'm often at a loss to explain how people can believe that a multi-million dollar municipal treatment system can leave dangerous substances in our water, but those same "dangerous" compounds can be easily removed with a $50 filter.

I understand about the fluoridation issue, but even that is present in such minute quantities that I don't see how the concern is warranted.


Municipal water treatment doesn't treat for everything that some other filters do. Also, many people don't like the chlorine in tap water and like to filter to get rid of it.

#19 Lasergirl

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 07:13 PM

Thanks for the reply and linkage, Teri. I'll probably have more questions when I'm done reading. :)


Jen- Kim has alot of good info on water fluoridation-- she's been trying to get the city to take it out of the supply. Email her for lots of info

#20 Outnumbered

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 07:39 PM


I'm often at a loss to explain how people can believe that a multi-million dollar municipal treatment system can leave dangerous substances in our water, but those same "dangerous" compounds can be easily removed with a $50 filter.

I understand about the fluoridation issue, but even that is present in such minute quantities that I don't see how the concern is warranted.


Municipal water treatment doesn't treat for everything that some other filters do. Also, many people don't like the chlorine in tap water and like to filter to get rid of it.


Point taken - I suppose it's a matter of personal taste. I just want to point out that there's no health threat to municipal water.

#21 Lasergirl

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 09:57 PM

I think part of the issue is the cumulative affect it has- so you drink it in the water and get fluoride treatments and brush with fluoridated toothpaste. All on a daily basis. It is a known neuotoxin-- so it does become a question just like any other, of how much of said toxin is acceptable on a personal level. There are lots of reports saying that water fluoridation has little impact on cavities-- so do I really want to expose my family daily to it? There are countries and many municipalities that are removing it from their supply-- which tells me there is something to look at.
There are so many toxins that we have no control over- I want to reduce the ones I can if possible.

Edited by Lasergirl, 27 March 2011 - 09:58 PM.


#22 terbear

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 12:37 PM

drinking water standards in Ontario are based on cumulative effects..

but yes you get chemicals in almost everything you consume so it does add to the cumulative effect. In addition, each person has a different ability to fush toxins from their body so what might be safe for one person is not for another.

I would start elimination of toxic chemicals from the things that are easy to eliminate first saving the flouride in drinking water for very far down my list