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Mattel Doll Sparks Outrage


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#1 Jen.Uh.Fur

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 09:32 PM

If you thought Barbie, with her disproportionately big breasts and tiny waist, sent a bad message to young girls, wait until you meet of Mattel’s new Monster High doll.
Clawdeen Wolf comes complete with a thigh-skimming skirt, sky high boots and heavy makeup, and spends her days “waxing, plucking and shaving.”
“My hair is worthy of a shampoo commercial, and that’s just what grows on my legs. Plucking and shaving is definitely a full-time job but that’s a small price to pay for being scarily fabulous,” reads the character description of the teen werewolf doll, who also lists her favorite hobby as “flirting with boys.”
But the most frightful thing about Clawdeen, experts say, is the shocking impact she could have on girls aged 6 and up -- the very demographic Mattel is targeting.
“These dolls are training girls to feel ashamed of their bodies, to focus on being sexually appealing and sexually attractive from a pre-pubescent age," human behavior and body image expert Patrick Wanis PhD http://www.patrickwanis.com/ told FOX411’s Pop Tarts. "By sexualizing these young girls, corporations also create another avenue to market and sell more products to a younger demographic. These dolls also promote skimpiness of clothing, encouraging a young girl to dress like a stripper and believe that they must be sexually enticing to everyone around them.”
Clinical psychologist Sari Shepphird, Ph.D. is also outraged by the message she feels the toy conveys.
“Young girls especially do not need a doll to point out physical flaws or encourage body image preoccupation in teens and young girls. Dolls are for play and escape and pleasure, and they should not be another source of criticism for young girls these days,” Shepphird said. “It used to be that dolls were part of childhood and represented and offered an extension of innocence, but now some dolls are encouraging the opposite of innocence.”
But the criticism aimied at Mattel's plastic plaything isn’t stopping people from purchasing it.
“The ‘Monster High’ doll is the most popular fashion doll we have today,” Bob Friedland, Senior Public Relations Manager at Toys R’ Us, told Pop Tarts. “We haven’t had any complaints from parents, customers who are buying this doll are very happy with the product and we cannot keep the dolls on the shelves.”
Mattel claims the dolls positively promote the acceptance of all individuals.
“Monster High was the number one best selling new fashion doll of 2010 according to NPD and is resonating with teen and tween girls,” a spokesperson from the company told Pop Tarts in an official statement. “Grounded in a clever and humorous storytelling, Monster High characters deliver a positive message of celebrating ones imperfections and embracing those of others.”
Body image expert and author of “Love Your Body, Love Your Life,” Sarah Maria, disagrees.
“Mattel is essentially promoting and encouraging the belief in young girls that they need to sculpt, tweeze, wax, and otherwise change their bodies in order to be considered attractive to men,” she said. “Please, drop the hypocrisy. A Mattel spokesperson has the audacity to claim the Monster High dolls are celebrating imperfections and accepting imperfections in others. Excuse me? If these dolls are about self-acceptance and acceptance of others, how about leaving some hair on the body?”


What do you think?

#2 Rox028802

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 10:20 PM

OMG! Hell would freeze over before i let my child have that doll!

#3 Rox028802

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 10:22 PM

http://www.stardoll....wdeen_Wolf.html

#4 jag

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 05:32 AM

OMG! Hell would freeze over before i let my child have that doll!

Yeah I agree! What ever floats your boat but I really don't see many buying it!

#5 terbear

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 07:02 AM

I don't see what the big deal is. I don't have girls in that age group so I haven't had to make the decision to buy or not....yet.

Just based on the limited info I have (a picture of the dolls and the article)....all I see is monster dolls going to highschool and it would be very unlikely any girl would compare herself to a wolf, a sea monster, frankenstien or dracula to begin with...

I can just as easily say the dolls are sending the message that it is ok to be whoever you are....vs the message that you need to shave, wear makeup and wear skimpy clothes to be cool.

It can all be twisted in a postive manner showing even monsters going to highschool are free to look, act and dress however they want because everyone is unique. The key is for kids to learn to be themselves. If the wolf wants to spend her day shaving and dressing a little more skimpy so be it because that is who she is. In my twisting, Wolf girl is not telling every other little girl to dress and act like me. She is saying this is me and I love me. If more kids said "this is me and I love me" the world would be a much better place.

Just saying it all can be twisted into whatever message you want it to be. The people in the article think it sends one message. I saw the possibility of another. Bottom line is who PARENT raise their kids and the importance of showing kids, especially little girls, that it is ok to be whoever you are and to never change who you are to please others

#6 It'sMe

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 07:05 AM

i don't see what the big deal is either. the fact alone the doll is a werewolf makes her pretty far from the "average girl".

#7 lissada

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 07:59 AM

I don't see what the big deal is. I don't have girls in that age group so I haven't had to make the decision to buy or not....yet.

Just based on the limited info I have (a picture of the dolls and the article)....all I see is monster dolls going to highschool and it would be very unlikely any girl would compare herself to a wolf, a sea monster, frankenstien or dracula to begin with...

I can just as easily say the dolls are sending the message that it is ok to be whoever you are....vs the message that you need to shave, wear makeup and wear skimpy clothes to be cool.

It can all be twisted in a postive manner showing even monsters going to highschool are free to look, act and dress however they want because everyone is unique. The key is for kids to learn to be themselves. If the wolf wants to spend her day shaving and dressing a little more skimpy so be it because that is who she is. In my twisting, Wolf girl is not telling every other little girl to dress and act like me. She is saying this is me and I love me. If more kids said "this is me and I love me" the world would be a much better place.

Just saying it all can be twisted into whatever message you want it to be. The people in the article think it sends one message. I saw the possibility of another. Bottom line is who PARENT raise their kids and the importance of showing kids, especially little girls, that it is ok to be whoever you are and to never change who you are to please others



i don't see what the big deal is either. the fact alone the doll is a werewolf makes her pretty far from the "average girl".



Completely agree with both of you! I think you could put a spin on any toy to make the toy look "bad" or "negative". In the end if you don't like it then don't buy it! Seriously they are toys...kids just want to play with them, they do not dream about and obsess over being like them!!

Edited by lissada, 18 March 2011 - 08:00 AM.


#8 emmsmama

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 08:51 AM

I don't have an issue with the waxing/plucking/shaving part. She's a werewolf so unless they are going to make the doll covered in hair then they'd have to say she waxes, etc. However, after looking at the doll I have to say she looks like a prostitute so I'm not crazy over the doll. I wouldn't ban it in my house, but I wouldn't go out of my way to buy it either.

#9 Ellivort

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 09:29 AM

I dont see a problem with the dolls. It isn't anything that kids aren't exposed to daily in the pop culture world we live in. Could they have been more responsible in the attire, of course. As parents it is/will be our job to make sure kids understand what is acceptable in a make believe world and what is acceptable in the real world. We shouldn't hinder imagination or fun simply to make our job as parents any easier.

#10 JeepMom

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 11:48 AM

Those dolls to me come across for teenagers...not the 6 year olds they are claiming s the demographic they are aiming for...sorry but my 7 year old does not want a doll like that, nor would I buy her one like that. Besides have you seen some of the crap barbie wears?

I dont have a problem with them....Bratz tend to be a bit more on the prostitute line then these..considering they are monsters and all..i think it is more poking fun at barbie and bratz then anything else.

#11 jag

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 12:29 PM

I don't have an issue with the waxing/plucking/shaving part. She's a werewolf so unless they are going to make the doll covered in hair then they'd have to say she waxes, etc. However, after looking at the doll I have to say she looks like a prostitute so I'm not crazy over the doll. I wouldn't ban it in my house, but I wouldn't go out of my way to buy it either.

That is how I saw it. I won't buy Bratz either and I am pretty particular on Barbie clothes too.

#12 Jill

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 12:44 PM

I don't get what the big deal is?? People are so sensitive.

#13 Kris

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 01:43 PM

I think they are neat! The waxing/shaving thing is no big deal she is a werewolf after all. Honestly I thunk the Bratz dolls were much worse than theses

#14 Mama2Gracie

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 02:34 PM

I think people over react way to just about anything these days. "Lets blame my daughters self esteem issues on a doll... it certainly can't be MY parenting thats doing it." I can speak from experience. All my self esteem issues stemmed from my parents, certainly not Barbies waist line.

#15 JavaBean

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 06:39 PM

I'm not fond of them but I'm also not fond of the Bratz stuff because, yeah, I don't want my daughter playing with skanky dolls period. Even if it doesn't cause all of little girls issues with self esteem, we certainly live in a hypersexualized society that sends the wrong message to little girls. So, I wouldn't buy it but I won't be picketing the stores that do sell it. It's all about informed choice.

#16 murkywaters

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 06:57 PM

Two thumbs up at this doll! I'm all for hairless women. If we could all be surgically altered at birth I say do it! If guys can get Circs why can't we get laser treatments!?

#17 Jenn1980

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 07:35 PM

Honestly i dont think the way Barbie dressed or how unrealistic her waist line was effected myself esteem whatsover. Id say more so media outlets such as tv, movies and music.

#18 Jill

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 07:40 PM

I'm not fond of them but I'm also not fond of the Bratz stuff because, yeah, I don't want my daughter playing with skanky dolls period. Even if it doesn't cause all of little girls issues with self esteem, we certainly live in a hypersexualized society that sends the wrong message to little girls. So, I wouldn't buy it but I won't be picketing the stores that do sell it. It's all about informed choice.


Exactly, what ever happened to live and let live, right? I wouldn't ever buy this doll for my kids, but I think it's a choice every parent can make for themselves!

#19 Mama_with_a_dream

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 01:00 PM

Meh it's a doll, a toy and if our kids can't use their imagination but know that there is a difference between toys, tv, games and real life then it's our fault as parents. My kids aren't much into dolls but I will admit they have Barbies and Bratz *gasp* but they never really questioned much about it at all. Maybe when there older it would be a issue?