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Spay/Neuter at Humane Society


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#1 LisaP

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 10:50 AM

I am thinking about getting my dog spayed at the Humane Society. The fee is only $150 which is way less than your traditional vet. I am assuming because it is the Humane Society I will be safe bringing my dog there. Has anyone else used their spay/neuter services? What was your experience?



#2 vals

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 11:57 AM

I use  the spay/neuter clinic regularly for my feral cats and have never had any issues.  The staff are friendly and organized and the vet is amazing.  The package deals are actually really reasonable for spay/neuter plus vaccine (its like $50 for the vacc package) and if your dog is larger the spay/neuter cost will be $250 which is still extremely reasonable.  Lower price certainly does not equal lesser care with them.  



#3 Neaser

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 04:06 PM

I brought my 94 lb black lab there and they refused to spay her cause she is over weight and I wasnt happy because for them to promote spay and neutering and refuse is wrong in my opinion

#4 Mama2Gracie

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 05:37 PM

I had to get my cat fixed there because I bought her there and I wasn't happy with then. She had a stinky butt that I brought to their attention and was told it was her food. Took her to my own vet and it turned out she had caught something while she was housed there and ended up on $300 worth of medication. Luckily my other pets didn't catch anything but they could have

#5 vals

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 09:02 PM

I get the weigh thing, just like people surgery is more dangerous and carries more risk for over weight and obese pets, but find it odd they said no. I've had pregnant ferals fixed there without issue and that's about as high risk as it gets. As for "smelly cat", was it an anal sac issue? That can be aggrivated by food and is not something they contract from other animals. Seriously, we've had more than 20 surgeries without issue, somIm shocked to hear two bad experience on a small forum. I'm a huge supporter because people need to be responsible pet owners and this takes the monetary excuse off the table.

#6 Mama2Gracie

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 11:50 PM

No it was some sort of worm that were apparently very lucky she didn't pass to my other cat since they share litter boxes. Stinky leaky butt. For months because they just said it was food. 2 days into the medication and it went away

#7 Trea

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 02:45 PM

They don't do obese dogs because of the extra issues and risks involved. A fat dog is much, much, much harder to spay, has a higher risk of bleeding and is likely overall less healthy to begin with. Since they don't do pre-anesthetic blood work to check liver and kidney health (liver and kidney flush the anesthetic out of the body, so checking that they are at optimal health is important) they also can't check to see that that overweight dog is healthy enough for an anesthetic. Anesthetic itself is more risky for an overweight dog. Recovery can be harder and longer for them and it is harder to give correct dosages of medications since all drugs dosages are based on "lean body weight". When the body has extra (or not enough) fat on it the medications are absorbed then distributed differently to the blood stream. This causes problems with anesthetics because they take longer to work, the dog needs a higher dosage of the inhaled anesthetic than "average" to stay asleep for surgery and then they take much longer to wake. They are also given a "premedication" that helps with their recovery. In an overweight dog taking longer to wake from an inhaled anesthetic that premedication can wear off making recovery "harder" for them or mean then require extra medication. There are a myriad of issues with spaying an overweight, mature, larger breed dog.  They promote spay/neuter as part of  "responsible ownership". keeping your pet healthy by feeding high quality food at appropriate amounts is also part of responsible ownership. So is spaying young, before they have a chance of developing a uterine infection and before their risk of mammary cancer increases.

 

As for catching worms at the HS. I don't think that is likely. Almost all dogs and cats are born with round worm. If left untreated it can lead to complications. Other worms can be picked up as a young kitten/puppy and not show signs for months also. The biggest thing with round worm is it can be contracted by humans.It can cause blindness among other problems in people. Kids are especially at risk for catching round worm for pets. This is why early vet care is important for all pets!



#8 Mama2Gracie

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Posted 20 August 2013 - 05:06 PM

I wasn't allowed to bring her to any other vet but theirs until the adoption was final so she went 6 months with it.

#9 vals

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 01:28 PM

They don't do obese dogs because of the extra issues and risks involved. A fat dog is much, much, much harder to spay, has a higher risk of bleeding and is likely overall less healthy to begin with. Since they don't do pre-anesthetic blood work to check liver and kidney health (liver and kidney flush the anesthetic out of the body, so checking that they are at optimal health is important) they also can't check to see that that overweight dog is healthy enough for an anesthetic. Anesthetic itself is more risky for an overweight dog. Recovery can be harder and longer for them and it is harder to give correct dosages of medications since all drugs dosages are based on "lean body weight". When the body has extra (or not enough) fat on it the medications are absorbed then distributed differently to the blood stream. This causes problems with anesthetics because they take longer to work, the dog needs a higher dosage of the inhaled anesthetic than "average" to stay asleep for surgery and then they take much longer to wake. They are also given a "premedication" that helps with their recovery. In an overweight dog taking longer to wake from an inhaled anesthetic that premedication can wear off making recovery "harder" for them or mean then require extra medication. There are a myriad of issues with spaying an overweight, mature, larger breed dog.  They promote spay/neuter as part of  "responsible ownership". keeping your pet healthy by feeding high quality food at appropriate amounts is also part of responsible ownership. So is spaying young, before they have a chance of developing a uterine infection and before their risk of mammary cancer increases.

 

As for catching worms at the HS. I don't think that is likely. Almost all dogs and cats are born with round worm. If left untreated it can lead to complications. Other worms can be picked up as a young kitten/puppy and not show signs for months also. The biggest thing with round worm is it can be contracted by humans.It can cause blindness among other problems in people. Kids are especially at risk for catching round worm for pets. This is why early vet care is important for all pets!

 

 

 

 

 

 

They actually do offer pre-an blood work, but its not included in the spay/neuter price and is an extra $50.  Many people won't pay it which is really sad.   If you have a pet who hasn't had a check up in years, its really not worth the risk IMO.  Fifty bucks is a steal for a little peace of mind.  


Edited by vals, 21 August 2013 - 01:28 PM.


#10 Trea

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:22 PM

Thanks Vals. Good to know they offer the bloods! That was HUGE for me when I was working. We didn't often find a young dog with issues, but it did happen on occasion. Older dogs, rarely did it stop us from doing the surgery but, we did often have to change protocols due to abnormalities in the bloodwork. Occasionally we did have to put off the surgery due to abnormal bloods (try to treat the underlying disease first) but, only one time I can remember that we didn't do the spay/neuter at all (found the dog had cancer!)



#11 LisaP

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 04:12 PM

We just got our dog spayed at the Humane Society today, she is doing great. They gave her shots too. The staff at the Humane Society were terrific. The fee was extremely reasonable, $180 for the spay, rabies shot and reg vaccine. It took a couple of months to get an appointment though. I'm glad it's done, I don't have to worry about her getting pyometra like our other dog did.  :)



#12 vals

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 05:21 PM

Glad to hear! They really are a great little clinic and with a additional vet added to the team the wait times are going to get much better :)

#13 Trea

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 08:55 PM

We just got our dog spayed at the Humane Society today, she is doing great. They gave her shots too. The staff at the Humane Society were terrific. The fee was extremely reasonable, $180 for the spay, rabies shot and reg vaccine. It took a couple of months to get an appointment though. I'm glad it's done, I don't have to worry about her getting pyometra like our other dog did.  :)

 Do you have a regular vet?

 

The #1 thing we heard at local clinics was "people with regular vets will still use them for these services". So far the majority of people I have heard from that have used the HS clinic do have reuglar vets. I'm just kind of doing a very un-scientific survey.



#14 Trea

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 08:58 PM

Oh, I know they are looking for at least one additional tech for the clinic too. Likely to help speed things up. (too bad I let my registration go. I would apply just to work as a tech again and they are the only place hiring rather than laying off)



#15 Jill

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 08:43 AM

I'm considering having HS spay our boxer soon. I love our vet, but with hockey and travel fees we can't afford to pay too much. She goes regularly to the vet, is fully vaccinated, including kennel cough and is being fed good quality food, so I'm not too concerned!

I have been reading a lot of conflicting information on when to spay a female.. Any advice?

Edited by Jill, 12 October 2013 - 08:43 AM.


#16 Trea

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 11:29 AM

Females should be spayed before their first heat!

 

There is really no conflicting information that is scientifically proven out there.

 

If they are spayed before their first heat they have NO chance of developing mammary cancer in their life. Each heat they have increases the risk of them developing a pyometeria (uterin infection).

 

Also, they have a chance of pregnancy with each heat. I've seen a lot of "not my dog" people wait to spay then have a pregnant female. (trust me, if they are in heat and out of your site for more than 1min outside, they will get caught. Even in a fenced yard, I know of quite a few "through the fence" breedings! I know of one person who took her female for a walk, on leash, and a male caught her. Once a breeding starts it is nearly impossible to break up and can be harmful to both parties if they are pulled apart)

 

Some say that spaying that young affects growth, no long-term studies have ever proven this. The only risk that does increase when they are spayed young is the chance of urinary incontinence. But, though that risk drops if you wait until they have had 1-2 heat cycles, no matter when you spay there is a chance of theym developing incontince after spay. Genetics plays a role in this also.  (If they are not genetically prone to incontince they will likely not become so after spay. If they are genetically prone they are more likely than average to become incontinant after spay)



#17 vals

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 07:52 PM

We just got our dog spayed at the Humane Society today, she is doing great. They gave her shots too. The staff at the Humane Society were terrific. The fee was extremely reasonable, $180 for the spay, rabies shot and reg vaccine. It took a couple of months to get an appointment though. I'm glad it's done, I don't have to worry about her getting pyometra like our other dog did.  :)

 Do you have a regular vet?
 
The #1 thing we heard at local clinics was "people with regular vets will still use them for these services". So far the majority of people I have heard from that have used the HS clinic do have reuglar vets. I'm just kind of doing a very un-scientific survey.


We have a regular vet, but use the HS clinic for our feral colony care because it's more economical ( enable us to fix/vacc more cats) and they have a lot of experience dealing with ferals. I know a lot of people opt for the speuter package ( vaccines, microchip + spay/neuter) even when they have a regular vet because the fee is so affordable. Just look a rabbits for example, $100 at the HS clinic versus an average $300- $400 anywhere else.

#18 LisaP

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 10:46 PM

 

We just got our dog spayed at the Humane Society today, she is doing great. They gave her shots too. The staff at the Humane Society were terrific. The fee was extremely reasonable, $180 for the spay, rabies shot and reg vaccine. It took a couple of months to get an appointment though. I'm glad it's done, I don't have to worry about her getting pyometra like our other dog did.  :)

 Do you have a regular vet?

 

The #1 thing we heard at local clinics was "people with regular vets will still use them for these services". So far the majority of people I have heard from that have used the HS clinic do have reuglar vets. I'm just kind of doing a very un-scientific survey.

 

When our other dog got sick we started going to the Dougall Ave. Hospital and will continue to use them. They are great there but we chose to go to the Humane Society because it is much cheaper than anywhere else and I had heard good things about their spay/neuter program. We just spent over $1000 a few months ago for our older dog to have surgery when she got pyometra so we didn't really have funds to get our other dog done but I didn't want to take a chance that the same would happen to her, she is 5 years old.



#19 LisaP

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 10:49 PM

I'm considering having HS spay our boxer soon. I love our vet, but with hockey and travel fees we can't afford to pay too much. She goes regularly to the vet, is fully vaccinated, including kennel cough and is being fed good quality food, so I'm not too concerned!

I have been reading a lot of conflicting information on when to spay a female.. Any advice?

Don't wait to long, our 8 year old dog got very sick from not being spayed. She got a bad infection in her uterus and within just a couple of days she went from a happy healthy dog to near death. 



#20 Kris

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 10:02 AM

IWe have a regular vet for the og but I think I will look into the HS for our new adopted kitty to get shots and neutered



#21 Jill

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 11:50 AM

Our boxer is only 5 months right now.. I'm trying to get a good idea of when her first heat would be, approximately. I know bigger dogs tend to be a bit later than small ones.