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Cat peeing outside of box


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#1 Lasergirl

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 11:37 AM

We have been dealing with this for over 2 years now. It is not everytime and he will go months without doing it, and then suddenly starts again.

He was doing it at our old house occasionally and then when we were broken in to, it ramped up a bit. Stress of course.

We have since moved and he is still doing it at this house.

I have tried everything I can think of:

-changing litter boxes

-getting an uncovered litter box

-getting a 2nd litter box

-changing litter

-changing food

-cleaning box everyday

-giving homeopathic remedy in water

He has some gum issues and we had his teeth cleaned, hoping perhaps that would help. It didn't. Bloodwork then ran when he had the procedure came back clean.

I don't know what else to do at this point and we are seriously considering getting rid of him. He is a great cat- very affectionate and fantastic with the kids. It is just getting to be a bit much and I can't have my basement smelling like pee all time.

Any others thoughts?

Or suggestions on where to bring him if we do decide to get rid of him. Makes me cry just thinking about it :(



#2 Trea

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 01:24 PM

Try a lower sided litter box. I was at a seminar a couple of years ago and, they found that, something like 75% of cats over age 7 and close to 100% over age 9 have arthritis. This can cause them to not be able to "assume the position" easily in a litter box, or, actually get inside a higher sided box. One of their suggestions was a large boot tray. Now, this can get messy around it if the cat is like mine and likes to fling litter to cover her stuff up! I've had clients built steps of some sort for the cat to climb into the box with also.

 

Your other option is "clomicalm". It is a daily medication that is sort of like prozac for cats. For the first 2 weeks or so they can had some behaviour changes (sleeping more, less social that sort of thing, on very rare occasion some aggression) but, that goes away (just like when a person starts an antidepressant).

 

Also, record everything that happened in the household 24-48hrs before he decided to not use the litter. You may notice a pattern. With my old cat it was when I'd move furniture in the living-room, even just to vacuum under it. She didn't do it every time I moved the furniture but, every time she did urinate outside the litterbox I had moved the furniture. One client found that it was when a certain person visited their home, another client found it was when her husband switched shifts. Sometimes there is no "reason" to be found. Then, I'd say it has something to do with the litter box itself. Likely an issue with him physically being able to use it.

 

If you DO decide to get rid of him make sure you are candid as to why. Somewhere around 80% of the cats people give up are given up because of "urinary issues". Cats are not "made" to be housepets really. They stress too easily and, they express that stress often by urinating outside the litterbox because that act relieves the stress for them (for some unknown reason)



#3 Lasergirl

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 01:51 PM

Both boxes are quite low. He tends to poop in one and pee in the other. The pee one is the lower of the 2.

He is also only 3- which of course is another cause for concern because what will he be like when he is older if we are having this issue now.

I used to think it was when there were toys left laying around, but have come to find that is not the case. I really can't put my finger on the stress cause at all. After the break in it was obvious and we tried to be as consistant and reassuring to him as possible- he was obviously freaked by it.

I have also thought of letting him outside. But he only has his back claws and there are a few cats in the area. And I also think that if he is stressing, I am wonder if that would add to it.

I think we are going to run him in for a urine test for crystals and then make a decision from there.



#4 Trea

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 02:41 PM

The thing with letting him outside is you will shorten his life expectancy. There are risks of more diseases and parasites as well as fights with other cats and encounters with vehicles.

 

I highly suggest trying clomicalm. He may need it the rest of his life or, possibly just a few years. Has he ever had crystals in his urine? I always suggest doing a urinalysis before any other treatments even though, in his case, it is not highly likely that is the issue (though,it could be, if he develops a few, but not enough to really cause too much inflammation, it can still cause him to resent his litter box on occasion because it is still uncomfortable). Urinating outside their litterbox is the #1 cause for surrender of cats, it is also the most complicated/frustrating problem cats get. It is sometimes impossible to know "why" they do it. Treatment is really the only option other than ignoring the problem.

 

You adopted him a 2 years ago. Were they 100% sure of his age. I always say, that once they reach full size, any cat's guessed age is "between 2 and 10" because there is no good way to "age" a cat. The fact he has needed a dental at before 3yrs of age also causes a bit of concern for me. Has he been checked for Feline leukemia and FIV? There are a few reasons that a cat would have bad teeth that early in life, one being in inherited predisposition to FROs(Feline re-absorption lesions, the body basically re-absorbs the tooth for some reason), the others being diseases that lower their immunity or, the "unknown" cause for some cats to have FROs. (honestly most of the ones I've seen get them for "no apparent" reason. Suspected inheritance but, no proof)

 

it is good to know is blood work was good though! My cat that used to pee in my basement on occasion died from acute kidney failure at age 7. I had no idea she was sick. She had been losing weight but, at the time I had a toddler who was chasing her around the house. She urinated on the carpet in my living-room. She had never done that before. After the second time I took her into the clinic and her kidneys were so shot by then there was nothing we could really do. :(



#5 Lasergirl

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 04:19 PM

Yeah I know- that is why I don't want to surrender. I know he will not be adopted and will likely be euthanized.

Thanks for the help



#6 vals

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 04:54 PM

I have a cat who has peed outside the box without cause or correction for almost eight years. We did everything, including multiple expensive tests for urinary issues and prescriptions to clomicalm and prozac. Some cats are just opportunistic urinators and pee because they can. Are you cleaning the areas with enzymatic cleaner? One thing, if it's carpet is to lift up the carpet, cut out the under pad and replace it and make sure to wash and seal the subfloor (paint it) or the cat will be drawn back to the smell. If the cat is peeing in the same spots, go to home depot and get a piece of plastic carpet protector (the clear runner with spikes), cut out 1x1ft section and place it in the area spikes up. Cats will notpee in an area that they associate with something bad. Good luck, it's tough!

#7 Lasergirl

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 06:35 PM

He was peeing randomly and we couldn't find it- just smell it. It is in the basement. But he has taken to peeing on a bean bag chair, and although I tend to just toss stuff because the smell never comes out, I am holding on to it now because at least I know where he is peeing. Not ideal, but it is easier to clean this way



#8 vals

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 08:29 PM

Get some natures miracle or urine-ease. It really helps. Also if it's in a specific room, you can try feliway plug ins. They do work for cats who urinate due to stress.

#9 Mama2Gracie

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 05:24 AM

We had this issue with Jake. He'd go months and months and then pee on something. We had to get rid of so much stuff, including an entire living room set. We had test after test after test done, spents hundreds if not thousands only to be told he was over weight. Something we were quite aware of. He began peeing in places that he slept which I was told cats never do, until it finally got to the point where he was peeing and just laying in it. That's not normal and no matter what those tests said, I firmly believe he was sick. We chose to put him down for several reasons. One being I believed him to be sick, two being that we were having several different professionals in and out of the house for Grace and I was terrified they were gonna smell cat pee and think we weren't cleaning and were unfit. I've heard horror stories of cas being called etc and didn't want to take that chance.

#10 babybumpkins

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 06:43 AM

When our cat did that..he had a urinary infection that we were not aware of:(...after meds and me bleaching the bo,x he was peeing in the box again:)



#11 Lasergirl

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 07:38 AM

Get some natures miracle or urine-ease. It really helps. Also if it's in a specific room, you can try feliway plug ins. They do work for cats who urinate due to stress.

Where do you get the plug ins Vals?



#12 Trea

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 08:21 AM

Get some natures miracle or urine-ease. It really helps. Also if it's in a specific room, you can try feliway plug ins. They do work for cats who urinate due to stress.

 

I totally forgot about feliway! I've had a lot of good feedback about it. Not sure if you can get it anywhere other than a vet, I know they can order it.  I did a quick "where to buy feliway" search and most replies on forums are "Try X, they may ship to Canada".



#13 vals

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 04:26 PM

Get some natures miracle or urine-ease. It really helps. Also if it's in a specific room, you can try feliway plug ins. They do work for cats who urinate due to stress.

Where do you get the plug ins Vals?

Pet Value and Petsmart carry the diffusers and feliway cartridges. They are not cheap, although petsmart has a 90 day money back on everything, do you could return it if it didn't work.

#14 harleyrae

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 12:15 AM

Our cat has been doing this lately also. But will go in the same spot on the floor. I put down puppy pads and he uses it. It helps with clean up.
He had dental surgery in may and we just found out about a month ago he is diabetic . We have to give insulin shots twice a day. It sucks !! I feel so bad. But apparently that has something to do with why he is peeing out of kitty litter. Also he had a urinary track infection so is on meds for that also
. I just took him to the vet for the peeing.
When is enough enough. He is 10 yrs old. My hubby says its time. By the seems ok with the shots unless I am just blinded.

Sorry for putting my own concern on ur post.

But I would use puppy pee pads

#15 LisaP

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 07:50 AM

Has he been neutered? My brother had a cat who peed all over to mark his territory and neutering helped.



#16 Lasergirl

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 08:56 AM

He has been.

We got the Feliway plug in. It has been a few days since any issues. We'll see what the next few months bring



#17 chat_cath

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 10:56 PM

There is a spray you can get so that they won't pee certain places.  I don't think I saw that mentioned above.



#18 Lasergirl

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 08:57 PM

So we have been successful with the Feliway up until this point. Now he is peeing on the futon mattress downstairs. I am at a complete loss and am coming to terms with surrendering him.

Does anyone know how to go about that??



#19 Trea

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 10:49 AM

Wish I could help you with that. The majority of adult cats surrendered are given up due to this same issue. Give the HS a call and find out how to surrender him.



#20 Lasergirl

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 03:38 PM

Last question- he is front paw declawed- is letting him outside a complete no no? There are other cats in the neighbourhood- almost all with homes, so not ferral



#21 vals

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 08:35 PM

No claws = no defence! It's just cruel and confusing, so not a good idea. As a last resort have you tried a reset? Basically confining him to one space with food, bed and litter box for a seven day period to retrain him. It gives you time to properly clean the pee spots. Bed peeing is tough, need to make a deterrent like bottles filled with pennies that fall when they jump up. Also can try getting a cat tower, something to offer a stress free escape. If going the HS route, when you surrender tell them why, it's not fair to lie about it because he'll end up returned and that's not fair to the cat or adopters. There is a $30 fee and he will likely be euthanized. Good luck with your decision.

* ugh autocorrect

Edited by vals, 16 March 2014 - 08:37 PM.


#22 Lasergirl

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 08:41 AM

We took him in to the vet- he has a mild gum infection, so we are treating that. And the Dr. put him on Clomicalm. But I can't seem to get it into him. I've tried tuna, salmon and wet cat food. We'll see. I may take his self feeder away so he has no other choice to but eat what is put out for him.



#23 Trea

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:12 PM

Best way to get meds in is to pop it down the throat. If you don't kwno how to do it then, ask to take him in for a demonstration. (or maybe you-tube it?) Some (many) cats take 2 people but, done quickly, with as little stress as possible works. You can also get pet "pillers" at pet value that may help, especially if you are afraid of putting your finger in his mouth.

 

Clomicalm along with re-training (like lasergirl explained) works wonderfully for most cats.